Cognitions About Problematic Internet Use: the Importance of Negative Cognitive Stress Appraisals and Maladaptive Coping Strategies

Abstract

The effects of cognitive appraisals of stress and coping strategies on cognitions about problematic Internet use have not been studied together in the literature. The Lazarus’s cognitive-relational theory is selected as the theoretical framework to further our understanding of problematic Internet use. The aim of the present study is to examine the mediator roles of uncontrollability appraisals of stress and maladaptive coping strategies on threat appraisals of stress and cognitions about problematic Internet use. The roles of negative stress appraisals and maladaptive coping strategies on the cognitions about problematic Internet Use are determined by using structural equation modeling (SEM) in a sample of 549 Turkish university students. The results reveal that by playing a mediator role, both escape-avoidance and accepting responsibility maladaptive coping strategies were found to be related with uncontrollability and hence indirectly influenced the relationship between threat appraisal and cognitions about problematic Internet use. Examining the role of the negative stress appraisals and maladaptive coping strategies will provide a new starting point for further research.

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Correspondence to Emre Senol-Durak.

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Senol-Durak, E., Durak, M. Cognitions About Problematic Internet Use: the Importance of Negative Cognitive Stress Appraisals and Maladaptive Coping Strategies. Curr Psychol 36, 350–357 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-016-9424-4

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Keywords

  • Cognitions about problematic Internet use
  • Negative cognitive appraisal
  • Threat
  • Uncontrollability
  • Maladaptive coping styles