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Current Psychology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 299–311 | Cite as

Practicing What You Preach: Infidelity Attitudes as a Predictor of Fidelity

  • Jana HackathornEmail author
  • Brent A. Mattingly
  • Eddie M. Clark
  • Melinda J. B. Mattingly
Article

Abstract

The current studies used the Perceptions of Dating Infidelity Scale (PDIS), which identifies attitudes toward three types of behaviors indicative of cheating: Ambiguous, Deceptive, and Explicit behaviors, to predict actual infidelity behaviors. Participants reported their attitude toward these behaviors and then reported their willingness to engage in these behaviors with a hypothetical target (Study 1) and reported actually engaging in these behaviors over the course of one month (Study 2). Study 1 showed that attitudes for Ambiguous and Deceptive behaviors significantly predict a willingness to engage in these behaviors with a hypothetical target. Study 2 showed that attitudes toward Ambiguous behaviors significantly predict actual engagement in Ambiguous behaviors during the course of one month.

Keywords

Romantic relationships Infidelity Monogamous relationships 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jana Hackathorn
    • 1
    Email author
  • Brent A. Mattingly
    • 2
  • Eddie M. Clark
    • 3
  • Melinda J. B. Mattingly
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMurray State UniversityMurrayUSA
  2. 2.Ashland UniversityAshlandUSA
  3. 3.Saint Louis UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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