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Examination of the Relationship Between Perfectionism and Religiosity as Mediated by Psychological Inflexibility

Abstract

A relationship between perfectionism and religiosity has been suggested in the literature, and this relationship is clarified further when the adaptive and maladaptive dimensions of both constructs are compared. Literature in both areas implicates the idea of a rigid and inflexible personality style that may explain why well meaning high standards can be associated with negative outcomes such as perfectionism. This investigation examined the relationship of perfectionism and religiosity, using adaptive and maladaptive dimensions, as mediated by psychological inflexibility. Validated measures of perfectionism, religiosity, and psychological inflexibility were given to 376 undergraduate college students in an anonymous online survey. Adaptive perfectionism (high standards) was found to be significantly correlated (r = .26, p < .01, two-tailed) with adaptive religiosity (intrinsic orientation). Maladaptive perfectionism (discrepancy) was found to be significantly correlated (r = .13, p < .05, two-tailed) with maladaptive religiosity (extrinsic orientation). Psychological inflexibility was found to be significantly correlated with the maladaptive dimensions of both perfectionism and religiosity. It was also shown to mediate the relationship between maladaptive (extrinsic) religiosity and maladaptive (discrepancy) perfectionism. Implications and future directions are discussed.

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Correspondence to Jesse M. Crosby.

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Crosby, J.M., Bates, S.C. & Twohig, M.P. Examination of the Relationship Between Perfectionism and Religiosity as Mediated by Psychological Inflexibility. Curr Psychol 30, 117 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-011-9104-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-011-9104-3

Keywords

  • Perfectionism
  • Religiosity
  • Psychological inflexibility
  • Mediation