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Human Rights Review

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 381–400 | Cite as

Improving the Effectiveness of the International Law of Human Trafficking: A Vision for the Future of the US Trafficking in Persons Reports

  • Anne T. GallagherEmail author
Article

Abstract

In 2000, the United States Congress passed the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act requiring its State Department to issue annual Trafficking in Persons Reports (TIP Reports) describing “the nature and extent of severe forms of trafficking in persons” and assessing governmental efforts across the world to combat such trafficking against criteria established by US law. This article examines the opportunities and risks presented by the TIP Reports, tracing their evolution over the past decade and considering their impact on the behavior of states. In looking to the future, the article focuses on how this influential unilateral compliance mechanism could improve its legitimacy, respond to negative impacts, and better contribute to the international legal regime around trafficking.

Keywords

Trafficking Trafficking in persons International law Human rights 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BangkokThailand

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