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East Asia

, 26:213 | Cite as

Cultural Policy in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

  • Cheol Hyun Jeong
  • Sang Hoon Lee
Article
  • 411 Downloads

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to introduce North Korean culture as well as its foundation, North Korean cultural policy. The paper consists of three broad sections. First, I explore the unique qualities and changes of North Korean cultural policy. Next, I look into what North Korea considers to be culture and how it is portrayed. Finally, I will analyze the similarities and differences between North and South Korean cultural policy, and the possibility of their convergence.

Keywords

Juche Kim Chŏng-il Kim Il-sŏng Cultural policy Cultural arts DPRK 

Notes

Acknowledgement

It is quite a mind blowing experience to investigate and make sense of the North Korean issue through their culture and its formation. Since it was not a conventional way of approaching North Korea, there had been some analytic difficulties and challenges. However, with a lot of my kind colleagues’ and students’ dedicated support and passion, it has been a memorable experience for me to conduct the research, write the manuscript and finally finish them. I especially thank Mr. Sang Hoon Lee who graduated from Cornell University, and currently serving the military duty in Yonsei University, for helping on this manuscript. Mr. Lee has extensive knowledge about North Korea, and showed great passion for this particular piece. I again thank him for his dedication and will to finish strong. Also, special thanks to Cornell Undergrad student, Sinclair Kim for adding ideas from U.S. perspective and proof reading the manuscript. Despite his relatively younger age, his academic maturity and determination to participate really impressed everyone involved with the paper. I am also most grateful to J. Ariel Jeong, a graduate student at Tokyo University for collecting extensive data, she has not only contributed the collection of the invaluable data, but also, helped me to carve and refine my ideas through thoughtful conversations. Finally, I will have to thank to all the North Korean interviewees who were kindly willing to do interviews.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yonsei UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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