To Live Apart or Together: Integration Outcomes of Astronaut Versus Dual-Parent Household Strategies

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the interactions between transnationalism and integration in a case-control study. Using a typology of interactions, the study assesses how a transnational household form affects structural and socio-cultural integration. The research draws upon 20 interviews with Chinese immigrants to Vancouver, Canada, to compare the integration experiences of women in transnational split households with those of women in dual-parent households. In the transnational split households, the women live with their children in the receiving nation-state, while their husbands reside and work in the country of origin. The findings illustrate an antagonistic relationship between transnationalism, and employment and financial integration. In contrast, results show a transnational split household approach positively affects housing and socio-cultural integration as compared to a dual-parent household strategy.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    To protect participant confidentiality, pseudonyms are used in place of participant names.

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Funding

This work was supported by a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Salary Award.

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Correspondence to Daniyal Zuberi.

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Ptashnick, M., Zuberi, D. To Live Apart or Together: Integration Outcomes of Astronaut Versus Dual-Parent Household Strategies. Int. Migration & Integration 19, 849–864 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12134-018-0579-8

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Keywords

  • Astronaut
  • Canada
  • Integration
  • Transnational split household