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Healthy Enough to Get In: The Evolution of Canadian Immigration Policy Related to Immigrant Health

  • Robert VinebergEmail author
Article
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Abstract

The health of immigrants and visitors to Canada has always been a preoccupation of policy makers. From the earliest days of migration to Canada, immigrants were considered potential carriers of contagion and steps were taken to protect Canada, mainly through quarantine. Since the 1920s, the line of defence has been moved abroad, benefiting both Canada and the intending immigrant who no longer travels to Canada in fear of being medically rejected. Medical prohibitions were often arbitrary in the past, but since 1978, they have been based on solid principles and the implementation of these principles continues to evolve.

Keywords

Canadian Immigration Health History Policy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Dr. Brian Gushulak, MD, Migration Health Consultants, and Dr. Linda Ogilvie, RN, PhD, University of Alberta, for their advice during the preparation of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Canada West FoundationCalgaryCanada

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