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The mobile telephone as a return to unalienated communication

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Authors

Additional information

Kristóf Nyíri studied mathematics and philosophy. He is a Member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and Director of the Institute for Philosophical Research of the Academy. Nyíri’s main interests are philosophy in the 19th and 20th centuries and the impact of communication technologies on the organization of ideas. His latest book is Vernetztes Wissen: Philosophie im Zeitalter des Internets (2004). For further information visit: http://www.phil-inst.hu/nyiri.

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Nyíri, K. The mobile telephone as a return to unalienated communication. Know Techn Pol 19, 54–61 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12130-006-1015-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12130-006-1015-5

Keywords

  • Mobile Phone
  • Dyslexia
  • External Memory
  • Mobile Telephone
  • Incoming Call