Civics without a Country?

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Notes

  1. 1.

    The National Task Force on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement, A Crucible Moment: College Learning & Democracy’s Future (Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2012).

  2. 2.

    Thomas Jefferson, Report of the Commissioners for the University of Virginia, August 4, 1818, text available at http://etext.virginia.edu/etcbin/toccer-new2?id=JefPapr.sgm&images=images/modeng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed&tag=public&part=14&division=div1. Further references to this work can be located within this document.

  3. 3.

    It should be remembered that A Crucible Moment is a committee product and not fully indicative of the views of the signatories. Thus, Eric Liu, who was a member of the thirteen-person commission, has written very beautifully and confidently of the need to “re-Americanize Americans.” Avowedly progressive himself, he nonetheless challenges his fellow progressives to abandon their allergic reaction to American exceptionalism. He points out how in the context of the revolutionary American creed, conservatives and progressives might find more common ground than either expected. Check out his essay, “Sworn-Again Americans,” Democracy, no. 24 (Spring 2012), http://www.democracyjournal.org/24/sworn-again-americans.php?page=all.

  4. 4.

    John Quincy Adams, “An Oration Delivered at Plymouth, December 22, 1802, at the Anniversary Commemoration of the First Landing of Our Ancestors, at That Place,” cited by Jeremy Rozansky, “Natural-Rights Conservatism: The Political Philosophy of John Quincy Adams” (bachelor of arts thesis, University of Chicago, 2012), 38.

  5. 5.

    Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub, What So Proudly We Hail: The American Soul in Story, Speech, and Song (Wilmington, DE: ISI Books, 2011).

Open Access

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Diana Schaub.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Schaub, D. Civics without a Country?. Acad. Quest. 25, 372–376 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12129-012-9307-6

Download citation

Keywords

  • Civic Education
  • College Learn
  • Crucible Moment
  • American Exceptionalism
  • American Creed