A Counter-Curriculum for the Pop Culture Classroom

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau, A Discourse on Inequality, trans. Maurice Cranston (London: Penguin, 1984), 85.

  2. 2.

    Johan Gottfried Herder, Fragments on Recent German Literature, in Philosophical Writings, ed. Michael N. Forster (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 50.

  3. 3.

    Ibid.

  4. 4.

    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business, twentieth anniversary ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 2005).

  5. 5.

    Ibid., 65.

  6. 6.

    Ibid.

  7. 7.

    They are: “Can’t Read, Can’t Write, Can’t Comprehend,” January 28, 2010, http://www.popecenter.org/clarion_call/article.html?id=2297; “Literacy Lost,” February 4, 2010, http://www.popecenter.org/clarion_call/article.html?id=2300; and “Forget U,” http://www.popecenter.org/clarion_call/article.html?id=2303.

  8. 8.

    Mark Bauerlein, The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (Or, Don’t Trust Anyone Under 30) (New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin, 2008), 94.

  9. 9.

    Ibid.

  10. 10.

    Ibid., 95.

  11. 11.

    Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death, 77.

  12. 12.

    Ibid.

  13. 13.

    Roger Scruton, An Intelligent Person’s Guide to Modern Culture (South Bend, IN: Saint Augustine’s Press, 2008), 109.

  14. 14.

    Ibid., 109, 111.

  15. 15.

    Carson Holloway, All Shook Up: Music, Passion, and Politics (Dallas, TX: Spence Publishing, 2001), 180.

  16. 16.

    Ibid., 181.

  17. 17.

    Kathryn Lofton, “Practicing Oprah; or the Prescriptive Compulsion of a Spiritual Capitalism, Journal of Popular Culture 39, no. 4 (August 2006): 616.

  18. 18.

    Mitra C. Emad, “Reading Wonder Woman’s Body: Mythologies of Gender and Nation,” Journal of Popular Culture 39, no. 6 (December 2006): 979.

  19. 19.

    Dennis Hall, “Spears’ Space: The Play of Innocence and Experience in the Bare-Midriff Fashion,” Journal of Popular Culture 39, no. 6 (December 2006): 1032.

  20. 20.

    Ray B. Browne, ed., Popular Culture Studies Across the Curriculum: Essays for Educators (Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 2005), 57, 105, 141.

  21. 21.

    René Girard, Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World, trans. Stephen Bann and Michael Metteer (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1987) and Eric Gans, The End of Culture: Toward a Generative Anthropology (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1985).

  22. 22.

    Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality, 90.

  23. 23.

    Johann Gottfried Herder, On the Origin of Language, in Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Johann Gottfried Herder, On the Origin of Language: Two Essays, trans., with afterword, John H. Moran and Alexander Gode (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966), 115–16.

  24. 24.

    Gans, End of Culture, 195.

  25. 25.

    Heraclitus, Fragments, frag. 91, trans. Brooks Haxton (New York: Penguin Classics, 2001), 59.

  26. 26.

    Scruton, Guide, 110.

  27. 27.

    See my “Edgar Rice Burroughs and Masculine Narrative,” Brussels Journal, August 27, 2009, http://www.brusselsjournal.com/node/4066.

  28. 28.

    Eric Gans, “Art, High and Popular,” Chronicles of Love and Resentment, no. 223, December 23, 2000, http://www.anthropoetics.ucla.edu/views/vw223.htm.

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Correspondence to Thomas F. Bertonneau.

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Bertonneau, T.F. A Counter-Curriculum for the Pop Culture Classroom. Acad. Quest. 23, 420–434 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12129-010-9196-5

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Keywords

  • Popular Culture
  • Commercial Culture
  • Popular Music
  • English Department
  • Frankfurt School