To Read or Not To Read: Responses to the New NEA Study

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    Notes

    1. 1.

      National Endowment for the Arts, To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, Research Division Report #47, Washington, DC, November 2007, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html, 5.

    2. 2.

      Ibid., 9.

    3. 3.

      Jacqueline Marino, “Homeless Men Find Shelter in a Book Club,” Christian Science Monitor, February 28, 2008, http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0228/p20s01-ussc.html.

    4. 4.

      National Endowment for the Arts, Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America, Research Division Report #46, Washington, DC, June 2004, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    5. 5.

      National Endowment for the Arts, To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, Research Division Report #47, Washington, DC, November 2007, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    6. 6.

      Ibid., 5.

    7. 7.

      Barbara R. Jones-Kavalier and Suzanne L. Flannigan, “Connecting the Digital Dots: Literacy of the 21st Century, EDUCAUSE Quarterly 29, no. 2 (2006), 8, http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/ConnectingtheDigitalDotsL/39969.

    8. 8.

      Anna Badkhen, “Libraries Move with Times, Discover Niches,” Boston Globe, October 22, 2007.

    9. 9.

      National Endowment for the Arts, To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, Research Division Report #47, Washington, DC, November 2007, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    10. 10.

      Ibid., 87.

    11. 11.

      Ibid., 88.

    12. 12.

      Ibid., 87–89.

    13. 13.

      Dr. Seuss, I Can Read with My Eyes Shut! (New York: Random House Books for Young Readers, 1978), 27.

    14. 14.

      National Endowment for the Arts, To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, Research Division Report #47, Washington, DC, November 2007, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    15. 15.

      National Endowment for the Arts, Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America, Research Division Report #46, Washington, DC, June 2004, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    16. 16.

      Leah Price, “You Are What You Read,” New York Times Sunday Book Review, December 23, 2007, http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/23/books/review/Price-t.html.

    17. 17.

      Stephen Krashen, “Are We Reading Less and Reading Worse? Probably Not,” DA Pulse, November 23, 2007, education blog posting on District Administration: The Magazine of School District Management, http://www.districtadministration.com/pulse/commentpost.aspx?news=no&postid=48777.

    18. 18.

      Caleb Crain, “Twilight of the Books: What Will Life Be Like If People Stop Reading?” New Yorker, December 26, 2007, http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2007/12/24/071224crat_atlarge_crain.

    19. 19.

      Ibid.

    20. 20.

      Ibid.

    21. 21.

      See http://nationsreportcard.gov/reading_math_grade12_2005/s0206.asp.

    22. 22.

      Michael L. Kamil and Diane M. Lane, “Researching the Relation Between Technology and Literacy: An Agenda for the 21st Century,” in Handbook of Literacy and Technology: Transformations in a Post-Typographic World, ed. David Reinking, Michael C. McKenna, Linda D. Labbo, and Ronald D. Kieffer (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1998), 323–41.

    23. 23.

      For an analysis of the pedagogical apparatus in a leading high school American literature anthology, see Sandra Stotsky, “The Negative Influence of Education Schools on the K–12 Curriculum,” in Reforming the Politically Correct University, ed. Robert Maranto, Richard Redding, and Frederick Hess (Washington, DC: American Enterprise Institute, September 2008).

    24. 24.

      Gretchen Schwarz, “Expanding Literacies through Graphic Novels,” English Journal 95 (July 2006): 58–64.

    25. 25.

      National Endowment for the Arts, To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, Research Division Report #47, Washington, DC, November 2007, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    26. 26.

      Ibid., 6.

    27. 27.

      I would like to thank Maurice Black for his thoughtful reading, astute advice, and generous encouragement.

    28. 28.

      National Endowment for the Arts, To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence, Research Division Report #47, Washington, DC, November 2007, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html. (Leah Price, “You Are What You Read,” New York Times Sunday Book Review, December 23, 2007, http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/23/books/review/Price-t.html.)

    29. 29.

      Price, “You Are What You Read.”

    30. 30.

      National Endowment for the Arts, Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America, Research Division Report #46, Washington, DC, June 2004, http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html.

    31. 31.

      See the 2005 United States Census Bureau data on school enrollment at http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/school/cps2005.html. Summary available at http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/007909.html.

    32. 32.

      Price, “You Are What You Read.”

    33. 33.

      Leah Price, discussion thread posting on January 11, 2008, at if: book, weblog of The Institute for the Future of the Book, http://www.futureofthebook.org/blog/archives/2008/01/reading_between_the_lines.html.

    34. 34.

      Maureen McLane, “Dispatch from the Good Reads in Cambridge,” posting on February 8, 2008 at Critical Mass, weblog of the National Book Critics Circle Board of Directors, http://bookcriticscircle.blogspot.com/2008/02/dispatch-from-good-reads-in-cambridge.html. Matthew Kirschenbaum, “reading between the lines?” posting on January 9, 2008, at if: book, weblog of The Institute for the Future of the Book, http://www.futureofthebook.org/blog/archives/2008/01/reading_between_the_lines.html.

    35. 35.

      Matthew Arnold, Culture and Anarchy, ed. J. Dover Wilson (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981), 6.

    36. 36.

      George Eliot, “The Natural History of German Life,” Westminster Review LXVI (July 1856), 55.

    37. 37.

      For a discussion of the importance of this community, see Anthony Kronman, Education’s End: Why Our Colleges and Universities Have Given Up on the Meaning of Life (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2007), 122–24.

    38. 38.

      These instances and many more are documented in Jonathan Rose, The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001). According to Rose, “The epiphany that struck Will Crooks is one of the most persistent themes of working-class autobiography” (8).

    39. 39.

      Esquith documents his work at http://www.hobartshakespeareans.org/. Jonathan Rose notes similarly inspirational pedagogical undertakings in “The Classics in the Slums,” City Journal (Autumn 2004): 13, http://www.city-journal.org/html/14_4_urbanities-classics.html.

    40. 40.

      See Matthew Kirschenbaum, “reading between the lines?” and Maureen McLane, “Dispatch from the Good Reads in Cambridge.” See also Jennifer Schuessler “The Death of Reading, Continued...” posting on January 25, 2008, at Paper Cuts: A Blog About Books, New York Times Book Review, http://papercuts.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/25/the-death-of-reading-continued; Jerry Harp, “The Strangeness of Reading,” posting on December 23, 2007, at KR Blog, weblog of the Kenyon Review, http://kenyonreview.org/blog/?p=669.

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    To Read or Not To Read: Responses to the New NEA Study. Acad. Quest. 21, 195–220 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12129-008-9055-9

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