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Academic Questions

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 135–145 | Cite as

Service Learning and Civic Engagement

  • Mary PrenticeEmail author
Articles

Abstract

Outside work can complement what goes on in the classroom in ways that benefit both the community and students. Of course, AQ readers may have heard of tendentious programs and faculty ideologues, who channel student enthusiasm into partisan activism. Still, statistical survey analysis presented here by Mary Prentice suggests that participation in service learning can increase students’ civic engagement, when civic engagement is defined as more than just political action.Outside work can complement what goes on in the classroom in ways that benefit both the community and students. Of course, AQ readers may have heard of tendentious programs and faculty ideologues, who channel student enthusiasm into partisan activism. Still, statistical survey analysis presented here by Mary Prentice suggests that participation in service learning can increase students' civic engagement, when civic engagement is defined as more than just political action.

Keywords

Civic engagement Community Involvement Politics Volunteer Service learning Reform 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational Management and Development DepartmentNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA

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