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Exploring the Impact of Age and Relationship Status on Heterosexual Men’s Discussion of Sexuality

Abstract

This study focused on heterosexual men’s attitudes and behaviors related to discussion of sexuality. Exploration of men’s discussion of sexuality is important because talking about sex can contribute to sexual subjectivity and build intimacy in sexual relationships. Comfort talking about sex, particularly with women partners, can also enhance communication regarding sexual issues. Heterosexually-identifying U.S. resident men (N = 742), ages 18–49, participated in an online study. Men answered questions about how often they discuss sex, who they discuss sex with, and their comfort level talking about sex. Findings indicated that men ages 18–29 discussed sex more often with other men than men ages 30–49. Also, men who are dating or engaged are significantly more likely to talk with both men and women about sex than men who are not in a relationship. These findings highlight that age and relationship status impact discussion of sexuality.

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Survey data collected and kept confidential and thus not available beyond this project.

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Funding

There was no external funding for this project. Penn State Abington’s Undergraduate Research Activities provided funding for payment for research participants.

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Correspondence to Beth Montemurro.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Research Involving Human Participants and/or Animals

Research involved human participants and was approved by the Penn State University Institutional Review Board.

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The research presented no more than minimal risk of harm to subjects and involves no procedures for which written consent is normally required outside of the research context. Thus, participants read study procedures before completing and implied consent was obtained by participants’ choice to answer questions.

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Henao, S., Montemurro, B. & Gillen, M.M. Exploring the Impact of Age and Relationship Status on Heterosexual Men’s Discussion of Sexuality. Sexuality & Culture (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-021-09900-2

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Keywords

  • Communication
  • Sexuality
  • Heterosexual men
  • Age
  • Masculinity