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Gender Differences in Estimates of Love Styles for Self and Others

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Abstract

This study investigated gender differences in how people estimate the intensity and style of love in themselves and in others. The six orientations toward love analyzed were: Eros (sex and passion), Ludus (game-playing), Storge (friendship and intimacy), Pragma (practical ventures), Mania (obsession and possessiveness), and Agape (altruistic love). The sample included 265 students (170 females and 95 males). Respondents evaluated their parents’, romantic partners’, and own overall love and the six love styles. Women endorsed self-estimates of storge, pragma and agape more than men did. Males assessed their female partners higher in mania. Gender differences in estimates of parental love styles were not found. Concerning self-partner differences, participants estimated their partners as being higher in ludic and manic love. Regarding generational differences, children well-tended to assess themselves higher in love than their fathers and mothers. Multiple regressions indicated that erotic, storgic and agapic love styles were significant predictors of overall love for self, romantic partners, and parents. Results are discussed with reference to previous research and some suggestions for further research are also noted.

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Correspondence to Félix Neto.

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Neto, F. Gender Differences in Estimates of Love Styles for Self and Others. Sexuality & Culture 25, 1871–1884 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-021-09855-4

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