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The Title IX Industrial Complex and the Rape of Due Process and Academic Freedom

Abstract

This essay is both a discussion of Laura Kipnis’ book, Unwanted Advances, and a philosophical–ethical assessment of the Title IX Industrial Complex which is the primary topic of Kipnis’ book.

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Notes

  1. It is unclear, however, whether the new Title IX guidelines contained in the Office of Civil Rights’ procedural handbook continue to grant such authority to local Title IX administrators: https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/ocrcpm.pdf: accessed on 2 March 2018.

  2. For a discussion of the nature of established law, see Corlett (2009: Chapter 2).

  3. For a more detailed discussion concerning the problem created in terms of construing speech acts as harms, see Corlett (2018: 123–127).

  4. For a detailed analysis in terms of the prioritization of rights over any concerns of social utility, see Corlett (2010: Chapter 3).

  5. https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/12/06/no-matter-what-jackie-said-we-should-automatically-believe-rape-claims/?utm_term=.158a8de49db9: accessed on 26 January 2018.

  6. For a more detailed discussion of linguistic education, see Feinberg (1985).

  7. Current U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has recently rescinded the 2011 Obama-era policy on Title IX, returning Title IX to its respect for freedom of expression and due process of law. Further Title IX reforms are in process and are said to be announced by way of the legally required process of open disclosure to public discussion, a legal requirement which was lacking in the Obama-era 2011 “Dear Colleague” Title IX document.

References

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Correspondence to J. Angelo Corlett.

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Corlett, J.A., Brillon, A. The Title IX Industrial Complex and the Rape of Due Process and Academic Freedom. Sexuality & Culture 24, 1687–1703 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-020-09713-9

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Keywords

  • Academic freedom
  • Due process of law
  • Freedom of expression
  • Laura Kipnis
  • Offensiphobia
  • Rape
  • Responsibility
  • Rights
  • Sexual harassment
  • Sexual misconduct
  • Title IX
  • Title IX Industrial Complex