The Use of Hornet and ‘Multi-Apping’ in Turkey

Abstract

Sexual minorities are still stigmatized in many countries. Coming out is not always a choice for many sexual minorities. Mobile dating apps and websites have allowed sexual minorities to selectively disclose their sexual orientation and preferences. They have facilitated and changed how sexual minorities connect and communicate with one another. Research has demonstrated that these apps and websites have allowed users to reach an audience with faster access and farther reach. Contributing to the current literature, I examine how Hornet users are also using other apps concurrently and how this has facilitated contacts between tourists and local Turkish men in an under-studied country. The results indicate that using multiple apps allows some users to overcome language barriers, especially between tourists and Turkish locals.

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Correspondence to Voon Chin Phua.

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Phua, V.C. The Use of Hornet and ‘Multi-Apping’ in Turkey. Sexuality & Culture 24, 1376–1386 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-019-09687-3

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Keywords

  • Mobile app
  • Technology
  • Turkey
  • Sexual minorities
  • Hornet