Predictors of Bisexual Individuals’ Dating Decisions

Abstract

Despite the capacity for being attracted to both sexes, 84% of bisexuals engage in opposite sex relationships. The mechanisms underlying these dating decisions are unclear. The present research explores three possibilities as to why this disparity exists: (1) a desire for sexual reproduction, (2) pressure to conform to social norms, and (3) base rates of the available dating pool. Bisexuals (n = 132) between the ages of 18 and 49 completed an online survey assessing their experiences as a bisexual person, perceptions of reproducing sexually, and their dating habits. Results suggest pressure to conform to heterosexual social norms and the makeup of the available dating pool play a role in bisexuals’ decisions to date the opposite sex.

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Funding

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Correspondence to Ashley K. Wu.

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Appendices

Appendix 1: Dating Decisions Questionnaire

figurea

Appendix 2: Importance of Children Questionnaire

The following questions asks about your attitudes and thoughts towards having children. Please answer the following questions to the best of your ability.

 Strongly disagreeDisagreeNeither agree nor disagreeAgreeStrongly agree
1. Without children, life is meaningless12345
2. I feel I’m breaking tradition by not having children12345
3. It is important that I have my own children12345
4. Having children is the ultimate goal in a romantic relationship12345
5. It is okay if my children are adopted, fostered, etc12345
a6. Children will interfere with my career and social life12345
a7. I’m not sure I want the responsibility of a child for the next 20 years12345
8. Having children will bring me a type of joy that nothing else can bring12345
a9. Having children will have a negative impact on my relationship with my partner12345
  1. aReverse coded

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Wu, A.K., Marks, M.J., Young, T.M. et al. Predictors of Bisexual Individuals’ Dating Decisions. Sexuality & Culture 24, 596–612 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-019-09651-1

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Keywords

  • Bisexuality
  • Gay/lesbian relationships
  • Sexuality
  • LGBT