Sexual Harassment in Educational Institutions in Delhi’ NCR (India): Level of Awareness, Perception and Experience

Abstract

This study examined the level of awareness of sexual harassment in educational institutions in Delhi NCR (India). This paper grouped the results of all respondents into two categories, i.e. Private and State institutions, wherein a total number of 430 respondents were selected from ten private and state universities by simple random sampling from their respective law faculties. The statistical tools used in analyzing the data collected were frequency and chi square which revealed that the level of awareness of private or individually owned institutions is relatively high but lacks clarity, and boils down to a lower level of awareness as compared with state or government owned institutions. The findings also revealed that private universities experience sexual harassment just like state universities. Based on these results, the author recommends the augmentation of awareness programs in all universities, especially private ones. Compulsory sexual education courses for new intakes could be arranged, and final year students could also be re-oriented before they graduate.

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Fig. 1

Notes

  1. 1.

    No. 384/1992 (SC, August 13th, 1997).

  2. 2.

    OA No.4341/2012 (Central Administrative Tribunal, March 6th, 2014).

  3. 3.

    LPA 330/2013 (HC of Delhi, August 23rd, 2013).

  4. 4.

    W.P. (C) 4427/2008 (HC, Delhi, May 21st, 2012).

  5. 5.

    W.P. (C) 8208/2010 (HC, Delhi, July 5th, 2011).

  6. 6.

    W.P. (C) 367/2009 and CMs 828, 11426/2009 (HC, Delhi, September 9th, 2010).

  7. 7.

    W. P. (C) No. 8226/2007 (HC, Delhi, May 29th, 2009).

  8. 8.

    2001 SOL Case No. 431 (SC).

  9. 9.

    Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal) Act, 2013.

  10. 10.

    “(a) publicly notify the provisions against sexual harassment and ensure their wide dissemination with clear terms; (b) organise training programs, workshops for the officers, functionaries, faculty and students, as indicated in the SAKSHAM Report of the Commission, to sensitize them and ensure knowledge and awareness of the rights, entitlements and responsibilities enshrined in the Act and under these regulations; (d) act decisively against all gender based violence perpetrated against employees and students of all sexes recognising primarily that women employees and students are vulnerable to many forms of sexual harassment, humiliation and exploitation; (e) publicly commit itself to a zero tolerance policy towards sexual harassment; (f) reinforce its commitment to creating its campus free from discrimination, harassment, retaliation or sexual assault at all levels just like the effort placed to disabuse ragging on campuses; (g) create awareness about what constitutes sexual harassment including hostile environment harassment and quid pro quo harassment; (h) include in its prospectus and display prominently at conspicuous places or Notice Boards the penalty and consequences of sexual harassment and make all sections of the institutional community aware of the information on the mechanism put in place for redressal of complaints pertaining to sexual harassment, contact details of members of ICC, complaints procedure and so on…employees and students should be inform of the recourse available to them if they are victims of sexual harassment; (j) organise regular orientation or training programs for the members of the ICC to deal with complaints, steer the process of settlement or conciliation, etc., with sensitivity; (k) proactively move to curb all forms of harassment of employees and students whether it is from those in a dominant power or hierarchical relationship within HEIs or owing to intimate partner violence or from peers or from elements outside of the geographical limits of the HEI; (l) be responsible to bring those guilty of sexual harassment against its employees and students to book and initiate all proceedings as required by law and also put in place mechanisms and redressal systems like the ICC to curb and prevent sexual harassment on its campus; (m) treat sexual harassment as a misconduct under service rules and initiate action for misconduct if the perpetrator is an employee; (n) treat sexual harassment as a violation of the disciplinary rules (leading up to rustication and expulsion) if the perpetrator is a student; (o) ensure compliance with the provisions of these regulations, including appointment of ICC, within a period of 60 days from the date of publication of these regulations;…”.

  11. 11.

    Sexual Harassment Workplace (Prohibition and Redressal) Act, 2013.

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Correspondence to Adetutu Deborah Aina.

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All procedures performed in this study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee of Sharda University, (Research Training Development Center) and written informed consent was obtained from all Private and State participants of the study.

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Aina, A.D., Kulshrestha, P. Sexual Harassment in Educational Institutions in Delhi’ NCR (India): Level of Awareness, Perception and Experience. Sexuality & Culture 22, 106–126 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-017-9455-5

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Keywords

  • Awareness
  • Higher Educational Institutions
  • Internal Complaint Committee
  • Private and State universities
  • Sexual harassment