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Society

, Volume 51, Issue 4, pp 404–407 | Cite as

“How Can We Stay Sober?” Homeless Women’s Experience in a Substance Abuse Treatment Center

  • Andrew F. Baird
  • Candice S. Campanaro
  • Joanna L. EiseleEmail author
  • Thomas Hall
  • James D. Wright
Social Science and Public Policy

Abstract

This article presents findings from an exploratory, qualitative examination of an intensive outpatient treatment program for homeless women recovering from substance dependence disorders. Structured interviews of seven current program clients and three graduates of the program were conducted to ascertain how clients maintain their sobriety in addition to meeting the unique challenges of being homeless. Based on these interviews, there are four main concerns discussed: lack of communication between service providers, inconsistency in personnel during recovery, inconsistency in relapse policies, and clients feeling ill prepared to live in the “real world” after program completion.

Keywords

Homelessness Recovery Substance Abuse Women 

Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew F. Baird
    • 1
  • Candice S. Campanaro
    • 1
  • Joanna L. Eisele
    • 1
    Email author
  • Thomas Hall
    • 1
  • James D. Wright
    • 1
  1. 1.UCF College of Graduate StudiesOrlandoUSA

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