Open for business in the black metropolis: Race, disadvantage, and entrepreneurial activity in Chicago's inner city

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Herring, C. Open for business in the black metropolis: Race, disadvantage, and entrepreneurial activity in Chicago's inner city. Rev Black Polit Econ 31, 35–57 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12114-004-1009-z

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Keywords

  • Business Ownership
  • Black Political Economy
  • Ethnic Enclave
  • Black Business
  • Minority Business