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Journal of African American Studies

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 337–352 | Cite as

AARMS: The African American Relationships and Marriage Strengthening Curriculum for African American Relationships Courses and Programs

  • Patricia DixonEmail author
ARTICLES

Abstract

African American Relationships and Marriage Strengthening (AARMS), a curriculum that consists of 10 core areas, was developed to be used for relationships, premarital, and marriage education courses and programs. This paper provides an overview of the rationale for each component of the AARMS curriculum, with the specific goal of providing a framework and strategies for developing an African American relationships course that can be taught at the university or college level or for relationship, premarital, or marriage education for community and faith-based organizations.

Keywords

African American relationships curriculum African American curriculum African American relationships African American relationships education African American premarital and marital education 

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Resources

  1. Below are resources that can be used to enhance the relationships and marriage course or program. Some of these are found in the AARMS facilitator's guide with instructions on how to use them.Google Scholar

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Films

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Online Resources

  1. African American healthy marriage initiative: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/healthymarriage
  2. African American relationships blog: www.relationshipstalk.com/
  3. Association of Black psychologists: http://www.abpsi.org/
  4. Black and married with kids: http://blackandmarriedwithkids.com/
  5. The better sex video series for Black couples: http://www.ebonyintimacy.com/

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of African American StudiesGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA

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