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Journal of African American Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 19–36 | Cite as

Maids of Academe: African American Women Faculty at Predominately White Institutions

  • Debra A. HarleyEmail author
Article

Abstract

The presence of African American women at predominantly white institutions is one of historical relevance and continues to be one of first, near misses, and almosts. Individually and collectively, African American women at PWIs suffer from a form of race fatigue as a result of being over extended and undervalued. The purpose of this article is to present the disproportionate role African American women assume in service, teaching, and research as a result of being in the numerical minority at PWIs. Information is presented to provide an overview on racism in the academy, images and portrayals, psychosocial, spiritual, and legal issues for African American women faculty. Finally recommendations are presented to assist African American women faculty, and administrators, colleagues, and students at PWIs to understand and improve the climate at their institutions.

Keywords

African Americans Women Faculty Academe Black women faculty African American women faculty at PWIs 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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