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Already aware of the glass ceiling: Race-related effects of perceived opportunity on the career choices of college athletes

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He earned his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University.

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Cunningham, G.B. Already aware of the glass ceiling: Race-related effects of perceived opportunity on the career choices of college athletes. Journal of African American Studies 7, 57–71 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12111-003-1003-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12111-003-1003-8

Keywords

  • Racial Difference
  • Racial Minority
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
  • Glass Ceiling
  • African American Study