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Biomolecular NMR Assignments

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Chemical shift assignments of Mb1858 (24-155), a FHA domain-containing protein from Mycobacterium bovis

  • Ting He
  • Shuangli Li
  • Rui Hu
  • Theresa A. Ramelot
  • Michael A. Kennedy
  • Yunhuang Yang
  • Jiang Zhu
  • Maili Liu
Article

Abstract

The forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is known as a phosphopeptide recognition domain embedded in regulatory proteins from both eukaryotes and bacteria with various biological functions. In this study, the gene encoding a predicted FHA domain from Mb1858 (residues V24-D155 from the 162 amino acid protein Mb1858) in Mycobacterium bovis was cloned, and U-13C/15N-labeled protein was prepared for backbone and side chain resonance assignments by NMR spectroscopy. These assignments are preliminary work towards the determination of the structure and phosphopeptide-binding properties using NMR methods, which will provide useful information about the function of Mb1858 protein.

Keywords

Mb1858 FHA domain Mycobacterium bovis Chemical shift assignments 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank for grant supports from Protein Structure Initiative-Biology Program by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (Grant Nos: U54-GM074958 and U54-GM094597), the “Hundred Talents Program” of Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No: 2016YFA051201) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No: 21575155).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ting He
    • 1
  • Shuangli Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Hu
    • 1
  • Theresa A. Ramelot
    • 3
  • Michael A. Kennedy
    • 3
  • Yunhuang Yang
    • 1
  • Jiang Zhu
    • 1
  • Maili Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and MathematicsChinese Academy of SciencesWuhanChina
  2. 2.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Northeast Structural Genomics ConsortiumMiami UniversityOxfordUSA

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