Biomolecular NMR Assignments

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 83–85 | Cite as

Backbone chemical shift assignments of the acyl-acyl carrier protein intermediates of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of Plasmodium falciparum

  • Santosh Kumar Upadhyay
  • Ashish Misra
  • Namita Surolia
  • Avadhesha Surolia
  • Monica Sundd
Article

Abstract

We report the backbone chemical shift assignments of the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) intermediates of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of Plasmodium falciparum. The acyl-ACP intermediates butyryl (C4), -octanoyl (C8), -decanoyl (C10), -dodecanoyl (C12) and -tetradecanoyl (C14)-ACPs display marked changes in backbone HN, Cα and Cβ chemical shifts as a result of acyl chain insertion into the hydrophobic core. Chemical shift changes cast light on the mechanism of expansion of the acyl carrier protein core.

Keywords

Backbone assignments Acyl-ACPs Plasmodium falciparum Fatty acid biosynthesis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Santosh Kumar Upadhyay
    • 1
  • Ashish Misra
    • 2
  • Namita Surolia
    • 3
  • Avadhesha Surolia
    • 1
    • 2
  • Monica Sundd
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of ImmunologyNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Molecular Biophysics UnitIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Molecular Biology and Genetics UnitJawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific ResearchBangaloreIndia

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