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Auto-immune Thyroiditis in an Infant Masquerading as Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome

  • Sunil N. Jondhale
  • Sushma U. Save
  • Rahul G. Koppikar
  • Sandeep B. Bavdekar
Clinical Brief

Abstract

A seven-months-old girl under treatment for pneumonia presented with generalized edema, decreased urinary output and was found to have hypertension, muco-cutaneous fungal infection and pulmonary hypertension. Investigations revealed that she had heavy proteinuria, hypertriglyceridemia, hypoalbuminemia and elevated levels of free T3 and T4 with suppression of TSH levels in the serum. A diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) in thyrotoxic phase was made on the basis of clinical presentation and presence of anti-TPO antibodies and reduced uptake in thyroid (technetium) scintigraphy. The child responded to carbimazole therapy and propranolol. The case is presented to remind pediatricians about the rare occurrence of auto-immune thyroiditis in infancy with rare complications such as nephrotic syndrome and pulmonary hypertension.

Keywords

Thyrotoxicosis Hyperthyroidism Auto-immune thyroiditis Infant 

Notes

Contributions

SNJ: Case management, literature search, preparation of the first draft, confirmation of the final draft; SUS: Case management, analysis of the data, intellectual contribution for improvement of the draft, confirmation of the final draft; RGK: Case management, analysis of the data, intellectual contribution for improvement of the draft, confirmation of the final draft; SBB: Case management, literature search, analysis of the data, intellectual contribution for improvement of the first draft, confirmation of the final draft and will act as guarantor for the paper.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsTN Medical College and BYL Nair Charitable HospitalMumbaiIndia

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