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The Role of Presepsin Obtained from Tracheal Aspirates in the Diagnosis of Early Onset Pneumonia in Intubated Newborns

  • Dragana Savić
  • Aleksandra Simović
  • Slavica Marković
  • Gordana Kostić
  • Biljana Vuletić
  • Snezana Radivojević
  • Marina Lišanin
  • Zoran Igrutinović
  • Radisa Pavlović
Original Article
  • 38 Downloads

Abstract

Objectives

To investigate the role of presepsin obtained from tracheal aspirate of intubated newborns in the diagnosis of early neonatal pneumonia.

Methods

A cross-sectional observational study was performed on 60 intubated newborns during the two-year period. Tracheal aspirate for examination was taken in aseptic conditions in usual toilets, by lavage with 2 ml of 0.9% NaCl in Mucus suction set. On the same day, presepsin (blood) was measured.

Results

There were 34 newborns in the examined group (with pneumonia) and 26 in the control group. Patient groups were similar regarding demographic characteristics related to gender and Apgar score. The coefficients of simple linear correlation revealed the statistically significant connection between presepsin (from tracheal aspirate) and birth body weight, presepsin (plasma), maternal infection and pneumonia. Significant differences in the values of presepsin (from tracheal aspirate) (p < 0.001) and birth body weight (p = 0.036) were found.

Conclusions

In intubated newborns, measurements of presepsin obtained from tracheal aspirate suggested that it can be used as a complementary marker in diagnosing early onset neonatal pneumonia.

Keywords

Presepsin Tracheal aspirate Early neonatal pneumona Intubated newborns 

Notes

Contributions

DS: Idea, writing the manuscript; AS and ZI: Writing the manuscript; SM: Analysis and interpretation of the data; GK: Acquiring and collecting the data; BV: The form of the study and the method of carrying out the study; SR and ML: Participation in biochemical analyzes; RP: Critical correction (revision) of the manuscript. ZI will act as guarantor for this paper.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dragana Savić
    • 1
    • 2
  • Aleksandra Simović
    • 1
    • 2
  • Slavica Marković
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gordana Kostić
    • 1
    • 2
  • Biljana Vuletić
    • 1
    • 2
  • Snezana Radivojević
    • 3
  • Marina Lišanin
    • 3
  • Zoran Igrutinović
    • 1
    • 2
  • Radisa Pavlović
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of Medical Sciences, Department of PediatricsUniversity of KragujevacKragujevacSerbia
  2. 2.Pediatric ClinicClinical Center KragujevacKragujevacSerbia
  3. 3.Laboratory Diagnostic ServiceClinical Center KragujevacKragujevacSerbia
  4. 4.Faculty of Medical Sciences, Department of Clinical PharmacyUniversity of KragujevacKragujevacSerbia

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