Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Prader-Willi Syndrome

  • G. N. Sanjeeva
  • Madhuri Maganthi
  • Himabindu Kodishala
  • Rohit Kumar R. Marol
  • Pooja S. Kulshreshtha
  • Elisa Lorenzetto
  • Jayarama S. Kadandale
  • Uros Hladnik
  • P. Raghupathy
  • Meenakshi Bhat
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

To describe the clinical presentations and molecular diagnosis to aid the clinicians in early diagnosis and appropriate management of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS).

Methods

Thirty-four clinically diagnosed PWS cases were enrolled after obtaining informed consent/assent. Demographic details, clinical data and anthropometry were recorded using structured proforma. The facial dysmorphology was evaluated. Appropriate genetic testing was performed to confirm the diagnosis.

Results

At diagnosis, the most common clinical features included obesity (59%) and short stature (53%). Distinct dysmorphic features were observed in 67%. Neonatal hypotonia with feeding difficulty, delayed development in infancy and childhood behavioral problems were reported in 94%, 94% and 74% respectively. Food seeking behavior and hyperphagia was reported in 67%. Seizures were reported in 47%. All children had underdeveloped external genitalia. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency and impaired glucose tolerance were found in 56% and 50% respectively. Sleep related problems were seen in 67%. Skin and rectal picking were reported in 67%. FISH confirmed micro-deletion was found in 64.7% and abnormal methylation in 35%, of which uniparental disomy was confirmed in 14.7%.

Conclusions

Clinical suspicion is vital for early detection of PWS. Confirmation of the diagnosis requires complex multi-tier molecular genetic testing.

Keywords

Prader-Willi syndrome Clinical features Obesity Neurobehavioral problems Genetic testing 

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. N. Sanjeeva
    • 1
  • Madhuri Maganthi
    • 1
  • Himabindu Kodishala
    • 2
  • Rohit Kumar R. Marol
    • 1
  • Pooja S. Kulshreshtha
    • 3
  • Elisa Lorenzetto
    • 4
  • Jayarama S. Kadandale
    • 3
  • Uros Hladnik
    • 4
  • P. Raghupathy
    • 2
  • Meenakshi Bhat
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric GeneticsIndira Gandhi Institute of Child HealthBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric and Adolescent EndocrinologyIndira Gandhi Institute of Child HealthBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Department of Molecular CytogeneticisCentre for Human GeneticsBangaloreIndia
  4. 4.“Mauro Baschirotto” Institute for Rare DiseasesB.I.R.D. FoundationVicenzaItaly
  5. 5.Department of Clinical GeneticsCentre for Human GeneticsBangaloreIndia

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