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Waist Circumference and Mesenteric Fat in Neonates: Negative Correlation

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Abstract

Objective

To measure mesenteric fat thickness with ultrasound scan in neonates and to assess the correlation with waist circumference.

Methods

Ninety five healthy newborns had the maximum thickness of mesenteric leaves measured by ultrasound examinations of abdomen with an Envisor scanner (Philips Ultrasound, Bothell, Wash) and a L12-5 transducer (Philips Ultrasound). The correlation between the thickness of mesenteric leaves with abdominal waist was calculated.

Results

Maximum thickness of mesenteric leaves ranged from 0.24 to 1.00 mm \( ({\hbox{x}} = 0.{57}\pm 0.{17}) \). There was a significant negative correlation between abdominal waist (AW) and mesenteric fat thickness (r = −0.384; p < 0.001).

Conclusions

Mesenteric fat thickness in newborns is inversely associated with waist circumference. Higher visceral adiposity in neonates may be a protective mechanism from intrauterine growth restriction however this could persist into adulthood life.

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Correspondence to João Guilherme Alves.

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Alves, J.G., Farias, M.P., Gazineu, R.M. et al. Waist Circumference and Mesenteric Fat in Neonates: Negative Correlation. Indian J Pediatr 77, 1266–1269 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12098-010-0179-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12098-010-0179-x

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