An extension of the goal-framing theory to predict consumer’s sustainable behavior for home appliances

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the extended role of goal-framing theory (GFT) on the energy-saving air conditioners called inverter air conditioners (IACs) in the context of the developing market (Pakistan). The GFT has three constructs, gain motivations, hedonic motivations, and normative motivations, which affect consumers’ sustainable behavior. The study is based on a survey of IAC users with the final sample size of 418 and using PLS-SEM. The empirical findings highlight the importance of all the three motivational factors and the negative moderation of perceived behavior control (PBC). There is a substantial direct effect of normative motivations, whereas the direct effect of gain motivations on sustainable intentions is insignificant. Implications for the marketing professionals and policymakers suggested the use of a mix-motivational approach to get sustainable results while promoting sustainable products like IACs. Avenues for further exploration into this area have also been recommended to future researchers.

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Appendix

Appendix

Items of the constructs
Gain motivations
Compared to a normal AC, Inverter AC is similar to a normal AC in most respects
Compared to a normal AC, Inverter AC is superior to normal ACs in terms of performance
Compared to a normal AC, Inverter AC is cheaper option over the longer term
Inverter AC are preferred to avoid environmental hazards*
Normative motivations
I feel a strong personal obligation to use Inverter AC
I am willing to put extra effort into use Inverter AC
I would feel guilty if I didn’t use Inverter AC
Hedonic motivations
“Imagine that you want to purchase Inverter AC for yourself and you have two options which are equally affordable for you: a regular AC and an Inverter AC. You think about the Inverter AC as an option. Answer the following questions as you think about the Inverter AC consumption”.
“What emotions do you anticipate you will feel from owning Inverter AC?”
“Compared to a regular AC, I will feel [pride] buying Inverter AC”
“Compared to a regular AC, I will feel [pleasure] buyingInverter AC”
“Compared to a regular AC, I will feel [excitement] buyingInverter AC”
Intentions to adopt sustainable products
Over the next one month, I will consider buying a Inverter AC
Over the next one month, I will consider switching to otherInverter AC
Over the next one month, I plan to switch to a sustainable version of the Inverter AC
Sustainable product purchase behavior
I often buy sustainable/Inverter ACs
I often buy ACs that are labeled as safe for environment
I often buy ACs that are not against environment
I often buy ACs that contain no or fewer chemical ingredients that may affect human and environment
I often buy ACs that support fair community trades
I often buy ACs that use less energy
When I want to buy a Inverter AC, I look at the ingredients to see if it contains things that are eco-friendly
Perceived behavioral control
I am confident that I could participate in energy reduction behavior if I wanted to
It is easy for me to participate in energy reduction behavior.
I have the relevant resources, time, and opportunities to participate in energy reduction behavior
Whether I participate in energy reduction behavior is entirely up to me.

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Hameed, I., Khan, K. An extension of the goal-framing theory to predict consumer’s sustainable behavior for home appliances. Energy Efficiency 13, 1441–1455 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12053-020-09890-4

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Keywords

  • Gain motivations
  • Hedonic motivations
  • Normative motivations
  • Perceived behavioral control