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Nuclear magnetic resonance

An early history

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Abstract

This article summarizes the early history of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) during the first 25–30 years. The methodology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for the breathtaking advances the technique underwent by taking advantage of technological developments in superconducting magnets, and computational and digital technologies. It has thus become the versatile investigative tool for natural phenomena that it is today, not only in physics and chemistry, but also in biology and medicine.

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Correspondence to B. D. Nageswara Rao.

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B D Nageswara Rao is Professor Emeritus at the Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI), USA. His main areas of research are NMR spectroscopy, double resonance methods, NMR relaxation theories and applications to chemical exchange in biomolecules.

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Nageswara Rao, B.D. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Reson 20, 969–985 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12045-015-0265-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12045-015-0265-5

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