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Protein stress and stress proteins: implications in aging and disease

Abstract

Environmantal stress induces damage that activates an adaptive response in any organism. The cellular stress response is based on the induction of cytoprotective proteins, the so called stress or heat shock proteins. The stress response as well as stress proteins are ubiquitous, highly conserved mechanism, and genes, respectively, already present in prokaryotes. Chaperones protect the proteome against conformational damage, promoting the function of protein networks. Protein damage takes place during aging and in several degenerative diseases, and presents a threat to overload the cellular defense mechanisms. The preservation of a robust stress response and protein disposal is indispensable for health and longevity. This review summarizes the present knowledge of protein damage, turnover, and the stress response in aging and degenerative diseases.

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Abbreviations

Gp:

glycoprotein

Grp:

glucose regulated protein, the number thereafter denotes molecular weight

HSF:

heat shock transcription factor

Hsp:

heat shock protein, the number thereafter denotes molecular weight

PolyQ:

polyglutamine

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Correspondence to C Sőti.

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Sőti, C., Csermely, P. Protein stress and stress proteins: implications in aging and disease. J Biosci 32, 511–515 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12038-007-0050-z

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Keywords

  • Aging
  • chaperone
  • protein damage
  • protein degradation
  • stress protein