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Use of an alfa-lipoic, Methylsulfonylmethane, Boswellia serrata and Bromelain dietary supplement (OPERA®) for aromatase inhibitors-related arthralgia management (AIA): a prospective phase II trial (NCT04161833)

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Abstract

Aromatase Inhibitors (AIs) are recommended for the adjuvant treatment of hormone receptor positive breast cancer in both high-risk pre-menopausal and post-menopausal population; arthralgia is the main cause of discontinuation of therapy and affects up to 25% of population on AI treatment. The objective of the study was to prospectively evaluate OPERA® (GAMFARMA srl, Milan, Italy), a new dietary supplement where α-Lipoic acid, Boswellia serrata, Methylsulfonylmethane and Bromelain are combined in a single hard-gelatin capsule to be taken once a day. Fifty-three patients with arthralgia (NCI-CTCAE v4.0 grade ≥ 1) occurring during AI therapy were enrolled. All patients received OPERA® from enrollment (T0) up to sixth months (T3). Patients' AI-related arthralgia was evaluated every two months with VAS Scale, PRAI questionnaire, and CTCAE scale. Primary endpoint was the number of patients with symptom resolution (G0) at T3 if compared to T0, according to CTCAE and VAS scale. Secondary endpoints were decrease in arthralgia intensity measured with PRAI score at T3 compared to baseline, safety of OPERA® and rate of AI interruption. Treatment with OPERA® supplement was overall well tolerated; no relevant toxicities related to OPERA® intake were reported. Seven subjects (13.2%) were not included in the final analysis because of consent withdrawal. 46 participants were eligible for final analysis. According to CTCAE scale, 10 out of 46 patients reported symptoms resolution at 6-month follow-up from the time of enrollment T0 (p = 0.0009). According to VAS score, 5 patients reported complete resolution of symptoms at T3 if compared to baseline starting situation T0 (p = 0.0222). Analysis of PRAI score showed a significant reduction in arthralgia-related pain perceived (p = 0.0001). OPERA® was able to reduce the intensity of arthralgia related to AI therapy. Randomized, double-blind studies are warranted to confirm the effectiveness of this dietary supplement.

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Correspondence to Ilaria Morelli.

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Desideri, I., Lucidi, S., Francolini, G. et al. Use of an alfa-lipoic, Methylsulfonylmethane, Boswellia serrata and Bromelain dietary supplement (OPERA®) for aromatase inhibitors-related arthralgia management (AIA): a prospective phase II trial (NCT04161833). Med Oncol 39, 113 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12032-022-01723-x

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