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Medical Oncology

, 36:15 | Cite as

Skeletal muscle mass as a predictor of the response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer

  • Takayuki Ota
  • Takeshi IshikawaEmail author
  • Yuki Endo
  • Shinya Matsumura
  • Juichirou Yoshida
  • Tomoyo Yasuda
  • Tetsuya Okayama
  • Ken Inoue
  • Osamu Dohi
  • Naohisa Yoshida
  • Naoyuki Sakamoto
  • Kazuhiro Kamada
  • Kazuhiko Uchiyama
  • Tomohisa Takagi
  • Hideyuki Konishi
  • Hirotaka Konishi
  • Atsushi Shiozaki
  • Hitoshi Fujiwara
  • Mitsuo Kishimoto
  • Yuji Naito
  • Yoshito Itoh
Original Paper
  • 284 Downloads

Abstract

Undernutrition and sarcopenia are associated with a higher incidence of chemotherapy-related toxicity and a poor prognosis in several kinds of cancer, but the impact of sarcopenia on the outcomes of chemotherapy for esophageal cancer remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate whether sarcopenia affects the efficacy and toxicities of chemotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer patients. Data were collected from 31 esophageal cancer patients who underwent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. Body composition was assessed at the start of chemotherapy by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and outcomes of chemotherapy were compared between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic groups. Of the 31 patients, sarcopenia was observed in 16 (51.6%). The incidence of toxicities was not different between the two groups. However, as for pathologic response, a good therapeutic effect (Grade 2 or higher) was more common in the non-sarcopenic group than in the sarcopenic group (53.3% vs. 25.0%). Multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia was an independent predictor of poor pathological response (odds ratio 8.02; P = 0.037). The results of this study suggest the potential utility of sarcopenia assessment in neoadjuvant patient selection strategies.

Keywords

Esophageal cancer Sarcopenia Chemotherapy Bioelectrical impedance analysis 

Notes

Funding

This work was supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI C) (16K09274) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takayuki Ota
    • 1
  • Takeshi Ishikawa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yuki Endo
    • 1
  • Shinya Matsumura
    • 1
  • Juichirou Yoshida
    • 1
  • Tomoyo Yasuda
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Okayama
    • 1
  • Ken Inoue
    • 1
  • Osamu Dohi
    • 1
  • Naohisa Yoshida
    • 1
  • Naoyuki Sakamoto
    • 1
  • Kazuhiro Kamada
    • 1
  • Kazuhiko Uchiyama
    • 1
  • Tomohisa Takagi
    • 1
  • Hideyuki Konishi
    • 1
  • Hirotaka Konishi
    • 2
  • Atsushi Shiozaki
    • 2
  • Hitoshi Fujiwara
    • 2
  • Mitsuo Kishimoto
    • 3
  • Yuji Naito
    • 1
  • Yoshito Itoh
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Gastroenterology and HepatologyKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Digestive Surgery, Department of SurgeryKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Department of PathologyKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan

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