Medical Oncology

, 34:179 | Cite as

Genetic susceptibility in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

  • Angela Gutierrez-Camino
  • Idoia Martin-Guerrero
  • Africa García-Orad
Review Article
  • 337 Downloads

Abstract

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading cause of death due to disease in children. The genetic basis of ALL susceptibility has been supported by its association with certain congenital disorders and, more recently, by several genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These GWAS identified common variants in ARID5B, IKZF1, CEBPE, CDKN2A, PIP4K2A, LHPP and ELK3 influencing ALL risk. However, the risk variants of these SNPs were not validated in all populations, suggesting that some of the loci could be population specific. On the other hand, the currently identified risk SNPs in these genes only account for 19% of the additive heritable risk. This estimation indicates that additional susceptibility variants could be discovered. In this review, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in genetic susceptibility of childhood ALL in all GWAS and subsequent studies and we will also point to future directions that could be explored in the near future.

Keywords

Childhood Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Susceptibility SNP 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Basque Government (IT989-16), UPV/EHU (UFI11/35). AGC was supported by a “Fellowship for Recent Doctors until their Integration in Postdoctoral Programs” by the Investigation Vice-Rector’s office of the UPV/EHU.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Genetics, Physic Anthropology and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and NurseryUniversity of the Basque Country, UPV/EHULeioaSpain
  2. 2.BioCruces Health Research InstituteBarakaldoSpain

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