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Medical Oncology

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 1032–1037 | Cite as

No association of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α gene polymorphisms with survival in patients with colorectal cancer

  • Soo Jung Lee
  • Jong Gwang KimEmail author
  • Sang Kyun Sohn
  • Yee Soo Chae
  • Joon Ho Moon
  • Byung Woog Kang
  • Jun Seok Park
  • Jin Young Park
  • Gyu Seog Choi
Original Paper

Abstract

Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the key regulator of cellular response to hypoxia and presumably plays a central role in the control of tumor growth. The present study analyzed polymorphisms of HIF- gene and their impact on the prognosis for patients with colorectal cancer. Four hundred and forty-five consecutive patients with surgically resected colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled in the present study. The genomic DNA was extracted from fresh colorectal tissue, and 2 polymorphisms of HIF- gene (HIF- C1772T and HIF- G1790A) determined using a real-time PCR genotyping assay. The 2 HIF- gene polymorphisms were successfully amplified, and the frequencies of each genotype are as follows: [C1772T: CC (92.1%), CT (7.9%); G1790A: GG (93.0%), GA (7.0%)]. Survival analysis including stage, age, site of disease, and CEA level showed that these polymorphisms were not associated with survival. For the clinicopathologic parameters, CEA level and TNM stage were significant prognostic factors in a Cox model for survival. HIF- gene polymorphisms investigated in this study were not found to be an independent prognostic marker for Korean patients with surgically resected colorectal cancer. However, further studies are warranted to clarify the role of HIF- gene polymorphisms as a prognostic biomarker for colorectal cancer patients.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer HIF-1α Polymorphism Prognosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Soo Jung Lee
    • 1
  • Jong Gwang Kim
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sang Kyun Sohn
    • 1
  • Yee Soo Chae
    • 1
  • Joon Ho Moon
    • 1
  • Byung Woog Kang
    • 1
  • Jun Seok Park
    • 2
  • Jin Young Park
    • 2
  • Gyu Seog Choi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Oncology/HematologyKyungpook National University Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of MedicineDaeguKorea
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryKyungpook National University Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of MedicineDaeguKorea

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