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Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 217–222 | Cite as

Forensic epidemiology: a method for investigating and quantifying specific causation

  • Steven A. Koehler
  • Michael D. Freeman
Review

Abstract

The field of forensic epidemiology was initially introduced as a systematic approach to the investigation of acts of bioterrorism. In recent years, however, the applications of forensic epidemiology have expanded greatly, covering a wide range of medicolegal issues routinely encountered in both criminal and civil court settings. Forensic epidemiology provides a method of evaluating causation in groups and individuals based in the application of the Hill Criteria, with conclusions given in terms of relative or comparative risk, or as a Probability of Causation. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of the methods and applications of forensic epidemiology.

Keywords

Epidemiology Forensic epidemiology Hill criteria General causation Specific causation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Forensic Medical InvestigationsPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Oregon Health and ScienceUniversity School of MedicinePortlandUSA

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