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Adiponectin circulating levels and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: the ATTICA Study

Abstract

Purpose

Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular-protective properties. Existing epidemiological evidence is conflicting on the exact relationship between adiponectin and long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Our aim was to prospectively assess whether circulating adiponectin is associated with long-term incident CVD.

Methods

A population-based, prospective study in adults (>18 years) without previous CVD history (ATTICA study). Circulating total adiponectin levels were measured at baseline (2001–2002) in a sub-sample (n = 531; women/men: 222/309; age: 40 ± 11 years) of the ATTICA cohort and complete 10-year follow-up data were available in 366 of these participants (women/men: 154/212; age: 40 ± 12 years).

Results

After adjusting for multiple factors, including age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference, smoking, physical activity, Mediterranean diet adherence, hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia, our logistic regression analysis indicates that an increase in circulating total adiponectin levels by 1 unit was associated with 36% lower CVD risk (relative risk [RR]: 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42–0.96; p = 0.03). Further adjusting for interleukin-6 plasma levels had no significant impact (RR: 0.60, 95% CI 0.38–0.94; p = 0.03), while additional adjustment for circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) modestly attenuated this association (RR: 0.63, 95% CI 0.40–0.99; p = 0.046).

Conclusions

In our study, elevated circulating total adiponectin levels were associated with lower 10-year CVD risk in adults without previous CVD, independently of other established CVD risk factors. This association appeared to be modestly attenuated by CRP, yet was not mediated by interleukin-6 which is the main endocrine/circulating pro-inflammatory cytokine.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the ATTICA study group of investigators: Yannis Skoumas, Natasa Katinioti, Labros Papadimitriou, Constantina Masoura, Spiros Vellas, Yannis Lentzas, Manolis Kambaxis, Konstanitna Paliou, Vassiliki Metaxa, Agathi Ntzouvani, Dimitris Mpougatas, Nikolaos Skourlis, Christina Papanikolaou, Aikaterini Kalogeropoulou, Evangelia Pitaraki, Alexandros Laskaris, Mihail Hatzigeorgiou, Athanasios Grekas, and Eleni Kokkou for assistance in the initial physical examination and/or the follow-up evaluation; Efi Tsetsekou for her assistance in psychological evaluation and follow-up evaluation, as well as the laboratory team: Carmen Vassiliadou and George Dedousis (genetic analysis), Marina Toutouza-Giotsa, Constantina Tselika and Sia Poulopoulou (biochemical analysis), and Maria Toutouza for the database management.

Funding

The ATTICA study is supported by research grants from the Hellenic Cardiology Society (HCS2002) and the Hellenic Atherosclerosis Society (HAS2003). Demosthenes Panagiotakos and Ekavi Georgousopoulou have received grants by the Coca-Cola Company.

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Correspondence to Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Kyrou, I., Tsantarlioti, O., Panagiotakos, D.B. et al. Adiponectin circulating levels and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: the ATTICA Study. Endocrine 58, 542–552 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-017-1434-y

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Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • CVD risk
  • ATTICA study