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Common pathophysiological mechanisms involved in luteal phase deficiency and polycystic ovary syndrome. Impact on fertility

Abstract

Luteal phase deficiency (LPD) is a consequence of the corpus luteum (CL) inability to produce and preserve adequate levels of progesterone. This is clinically manifested by short menstrual cycles and infertility. Abnormal follicular development, defects in neo-angiogenesis or inadequate steroidogenesis in the lutein cells of the CL have been implicated in CL dysfunction and LPD. LPD and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are independent disorders sharing common pathophysiological profiles. Factors such as hyperinsulinemia, AMH excess, and defects in angiogenesis of CL are at the origin of both LPD and PCOS. In PCOS ovulatory cycles, infertility could result from dysfunctional CL. The aim of this review was to investigate common mechanisms of infertility in CL dysfunction and PCOS.

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Correspondence to Georgios Boutzios.

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Boutzios, G., Karalaki, M. & Zapanti, E. Common pathophysiological mechanisms involved in luteal phase deficiency and polycystic ovary syndrome. Impact on fertility. Endocrine 43, 314–317 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-012-9778-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-012-9778-9

Keywords

  • Corpus luteum
  • Luteal phase defect
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Infertility