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Treatment of Eczema

Abstract

Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached nearly epidemic proportions in childhood. Moreover, it is a difficult disease to control and, with its onset in childhood, is often the first manifestation of atopy. The clinical features of eczema include itchy red skin accompanied by dryness and lichenification. In the past, treatment options consisted primarily of avoidance of soap and water. These options have considerably improved with both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. However, eczema is still a treatment challenge. Part of the problem in developing new treatment options has been the relative failure in translating basic science information into clinical application. It is hoped that the newer biologics will help bridge this gap and lead to greater success rates.

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Chang, C., Keen, C.L. & Gershwin, M.E. Treatment of Eczema. Clinic Rev Allerg Immunol 33, 204–225 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12016-007-0033-8

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Keywords

  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Immunoglobulin E
  • Food allergy
  • Soap
  • Immunotherapy