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Detection and Analysis of 12 Heavy Metals in Blood and Hair Sample from a General Population of Pearl River Delta Area

Abstract

To detect the content of 12 heavy metals in blood and hair sample from a general population of Pearl River Delta area, and to analyze the influence of duration of residence, gender, age, smoking and drinking on the heavy metal content. Use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to detect the content of 12 heavy metals lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), copper (Cu), chrome (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn) and antimony (Sb) in blood and hair samples of a total of 50 subjects from a general population, collected by multistage stratified cluster random sampling method. The geometric mean of heavy metal content in blood samples of general population (μg/L): blood aluminum 214.00; blood chrome 92.82; blood manganese 21.43; blood nickel 20.59; blood copper 0.67; blood zinc 11.50; blood arsenic 0.55; blood cadmium 2.45; blood tin 0.00; blood antimony 1.92; blood lead 158.84; and blood mercury 1.19. The geometric mean of heavy metal content in hair samples of general population (μg/g): hair aluminum is 84.65; hair chrome 0.00; hair manganese 2.44; hair nickel 0.61; hair copper 28.49; hair zinc 136.65; hair arsenic 0.75; hair cadmium 0.46; hair tin 1.04; hair antimony 0.05; hair lead 8.97; and hair mercury 0.69. Some heavy metals were correlated with duration of residence, gender, age, smoking and drinking. This was the first time that simultaneously detecting heavy metal content in blood and hair was used to analyze the internal heavy metal burden in resident population of Pearl River Delta area. These data can serve as reference for further research.

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Correspondence to Jiren Zhang or Jingfen Zheng.

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Li, J., Cen, D., Huang, D. et al. Detection and Analysis of 12 Heavy Metals in Blood and Hair Sample from a General Population of Pearl River Delta Area. Cell Biochem Biophys 70, 1663–1669 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12013-014-0110-6

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Keywords

  • Heavy metal
  • Internal exposure
  • Lead
  • Cadmium
  • Mercury
  • Arsenic
  • Aluminum