Zinc, Copper, Iron, and Chromium Concentrations in Young Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract

Homeostasis of trace elements can be disrupted by diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, disturbance in trace element status in diabetes mellitus may contribute to the insulin resistance and development of diabetic complications. The aim of present study was to compare the concentration of essential trace elements, zinc, copper, iron, and chromium in serum of patients who have type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 20) with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 20). The serum concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and chromium were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Shimadzu AA 670, Kyoto, Japan) after acid digestion. The results of this study showed that the mean values of zinc, copper, and chromium were significantly lower in the serum of patients with diabetes as compared to the control subjects (P < 0.05). Our results show that deficiency of some essential trace elements may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

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Correspondence to M. Basaki.

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Basaki, M., Saeb, M., Nazifi, S. et al. Zinc, Copper, Iron, and Chromium Concentrations in Young Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Biol Trace Elem Res 148, 161–164 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-012-9360-6

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Keywords

  • Trace elements
  • Zinc
  • Copper
  • Iron
  • Chromium
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus