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Permissible Value for Vanadium in Allitic Udic Ferrisols Based on Physiological Responses of Green Chinese Cabbage and Soil Microbes

Abstract

Greenhouse experiments were conducted to study the permissible value of vanadium (V) based on the growth and physiological responses of green Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis L.), and effects of V on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and enzyme activities in allitic udic ferrisols were also studied. The results showed that biomass of cabbage grown on soil treated with 133 mg V kg−1 significantly decreased by 25.1% compared with the control (P < 0.05). Vanadium concentrations in leaves and roots increased with increasing soil V concentration. Contents of vitamin C (Vc) increased by 10.3%, while that of soluble sugar in leaves significantly decreased by 54.0% when soil V concentration was 133 mg kg−1, respectively. The uptake of essential nutrient elements by cabbage was disturbed when soil V concentration exceeded 253 mg kg−1. Soil MBC was significantly stimulated by 15.5%, while dehydrogenase activity significantly decreased by 62.8% and urease activity slightly changed at treatment of 133 mg V kg−1 as compared with the control, respectively. Therefore, the permissible value of V in allitic udic ferrisols is proposed as 130 mg kg−1.

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Acknowledgment

The authors are grateful to the foundation of Changsha Science and Technology Project (No. K1003056-31). We also thank Dr. Shu Zhang from Curtin University, Australia for his assistance with the grammar of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Zhao-hui Guo.

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Xiao, Xy., Yang, M., Guo, Zh. et al. Permissible Value for Vanadium in Allitic Udic Ferrisols Based on Physiological Responses of Green Chinese Cabbage and Soil Microbes. Biol Trace Elem Res 145, 225–232 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-011-9183-x

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Keywords

  • Vanadium
  • Allitic udic ferrisols
  • Permissible value
  • Physiological response
  • Green Chinese cabbage