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The Analysis of Copper, Selenium, and Molybdenum Contents in Frequently Consumed Foods and an Estimation of Their Daily Intake in Korean Adults

Abstract

This study aimed to analyze the amounts of copper, selenium, and molybdenum among trace minerals in foods and to evaluate their daily intakes in Korean adults. Contents of copper, selenium, and molybdenum in 366 varieties of foods commonly consumed by Koreans were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, techniques with low detection limits as well as high reproducibility and precision. Next, we evaluated the status of trace mineral intake using the 24-h recall method after conducting anthropometric measurements on 249 male and 344 female adults aged 20 or older. The average daily energy intake for males was 7,452.8 kJ, significantly higher than the 6,118.3 kJ for females (p < 0.001). The average daily copper, selenium, and molybdenum intakes by males were 1,156.7, 135.5, and 12.2 μg, respectively, compared to 1,028.5, 122.9, and 10.1 μg, respectively, by females. In males, the intake levels of copper and molybdenum were both significantly higher than in females. By continuously evaluating intake levels in this manner, it is anticipated that reference intakes of trace minerals will be established.

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Correspondence to Mi-Kyeong Choi.

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Choi, MK., Kang, MH. & Kim, MH. The Analysis of Copper, Selenium, and Molybdenum Contents in Frequently Consumed Foods and an Estimation of Their Daily Intake in Korean Adults. Biol Trace Elem Res 128, 104–117 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-008-8260-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-008-8260-2

Keywords

  • Copper
  • Selenium
  • Molybdenum
  • Food composition
  • Daily intake