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Effects of Exhaustion and Calcium Supplementation on Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Cortisol Levels in Athletes

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Abstract

The present study was performed to investigate the effects of strenuous exercise and calcium supplementation on cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels in athletes at rest and exhaustion. Thirty male athletes, ages 17–21 years, were enrolled in the 4-week study. They were divided into three groups as follows: group 1 (n = 10): training without supplementation; group 2 (n = 10): training and calcium supplemented, and group 3 (n = 10): calcium supplemented without training. Venous blood samples were obtained for determination of the hormones. One-month supplementation with calcium does not influence the cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone in athletes, but strenuous exercise results in a significant increase in their levels with or without supplementation (p < 0.05).

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Cinar, V., Cakmakci, O., Mogulkoc, R. et al. Effects of Exhaustion and Calcium Supplementation on Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Cortisol Levels in Athletes. Biol Trace Elem Res 127, 1–5 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-008-8217-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-008-8217-5

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