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Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 166, Issue 1, pp 165–175 | Cite as

Photoprotective Effects of a Formulation Containing Tannase-Converted Green Tea Extract Against UVB-Induced Oxidative Stress in Hairless Mice

  • Yang-Hee Hong
  • Eun Young Jung
  • Kwang-Soon Shin
  • Tae Young Kim
  • Kwang-Won Yu
  • Un Jae ChangEmail author
  • Hyung Joo SuhEmail author
Article

Abstract

Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation may induce the acceleration of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to develop an effective formulation containing tannase-converted green tea extract (FTGE) to inhibit UVB-induced oxidative damage. Significant (p < 0.05) prevention of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) depletion was observed in mice treated with FTGE. The hydrogen peroxide levels of mice treated with FTGE were similar to those of UVB non-irradiated mice. No significant difference was observed between No UVB control and FTGE mice. Also, mice treated with FTGE had significant (p < 0.05) decreases in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels by lipid peroxidation compared with No UVB control mice. Our data suggest that this formulation may be effective in protecting skin from UVB photodamage.

Keywords

Green tea Tannase Formulation Oxidative stress Photoprotection 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This research was supported by the Technology Development Program for Food, Ministry for Food, Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries, Republic of Korea.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yang-Hee Hong
    • 1
  • Eun Young Jung
    • 2
  • Kwang-Soon Shin
    • 3
  • Tae Young Kim
    • 4
  • Kwang-Won Yu
    • 5
  • Un Jae Chang
    • 6
    Email author
  • Hyung Joo Suh
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Research Institute of Health and SciencesKorea UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food and NutritionKorea UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Food Science and BiotechnologyKyonggi UniversitySuwonRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Bionic Trading CorporationAnsanRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Department of Food and NutritionChungju National UniversityJeungpyeongRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Department of Food and NutritionDongduk Women’s UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea

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