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Abstract

Online science and engineering ethics (SEE) education can support appropriate goals for SEE and the highly interactive pedagogy that attains those goals. Recent work in moral psychology suggests pedagogical goals for SEE education that are surprisingly similar to goals enunciated by several panels in SEE. Classroom-based interactive study of SEE cases is a suitable method to achieve these goals. Well-designed cases, with appropriate goals and structure can be easily adapted to courses that have online components. It is less clear that exclusively online methods can support the wide range of goals necessary to good moral pedagogy in SEE, though there seems no a priori reason to rule this out. Only careful, goal-based assessment of online case study SEE teaching can resolve this question.

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Correspondence to Chuck Huff or William Frey.

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Huff, C., Frey, W. Moral pedagogy and practical ethics. SCI ENG ETHICS 11, 389–408 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11948-005-0008-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11948-005-0008-1

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