Food and Bioprocess Technology

, Volume 6, Issue 11, pp 3200–3205 | Cite as

Ohmic Tempering of Frozen Potato Puree

  • Nadide Seyhun
  • Hosahalli S. Ramaswamy
  • Songming Zhu
  • Gulum Sumnu
  • Serpil Sahin
Original Paper

Abstract

Frozen potato puree samples were tempered using an ohmic heating technique. Three salt concentrations (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 %) and three frequency levels (10, 20, and 30 kHz) were used as experimental variables, and the effects of salt concentration and frequency on ohmic tempering were investigated. Temperature, electrical current, and voltage were measured during the ohmic tempering. Electrical conductivities were evaluated based on the sample geometry and the ohmic heating principle. Increasing the salt concentration and/or frequency increased the electrical conductivity and heating rate, and hence contributed to decreasing the tempering time for the frozen potato puree samples. The tempering time was lowest with the highest salt concentration employed, and longest for the lowest salt concentration and frequency. Temperature differences within the sample during ohmic heating were found to be lowest when employing 0.50 % salt concentration and 10 kHz frequency.

Keywords

Ohmic heating Ohmic tempering Thawing Frozen potato puree 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadide Seyhun
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hosahalli S. Ramaswamy
    • 2
  • Songming Zhu
    • 2
    • 4
  • Gulum Sumnu
    • 1
  • Serpil Sahin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food EngineeringMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Food Science and Agricultural ChemistryMcGill University Macdonald CampusMontrealCanada
  3. 3.Department of Food Technology, Ihsaniye Meslek YuksekokuluKocaeli UniversityKocaeliTurkey
  4. 4.College of Biosystems Engineering and Food ScienceZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina

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