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An Empirical Review of Treatment and Rehabilitation Approaches Used in the Acute, Sub-Acute, and Chronic Phases of Recovery Following Sports-Related Concussion

Opinion statement

Several treatment and rehabilitation approaches for sport-related concussion have been mentioned in recent consensus and position statements. These options range from the more conservative behavioral management approaches to aggressive pharmacological and therapeutic interventions. Moreover, clinical decision-making for sport-related concussion changes as symptoms and impairments persist throughout recovery. The current article provides an empirical review of proposed treatment and rehabilitation options for sport-related concussion during the acute, subacute, and chronic phases of injury.

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Conflict of Interest

R.J. Elbin, Harrison B. Lowder, and Anthony P. Kontos declare no conflict of interest.

Phil Schatz declares that he has served as a consultant for ImPACT Applications, Inc., outside the submitted work.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Correspondence to R. J. Elbin PhD.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Traumatic Brain Injury

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Elbin, R.J., Schatz, P., Lowder, H.B. et al. An Empirical Review of Treatment and Rehabilitation Approaches Used in the Acute, Sub-Acute, and Chronic Phases of Recovery Following Sports-Related Concussion. Curr Treat Options Neurol 16, 320 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11940-014-0320-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11940-014-0320-7

Keywords

  • Concussion
  • Post-concussion syndrome
  • Treatment
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical trajectories