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Advances in Ambulatory Urodynamics

Abstract

Purpose of Review

This manuscript reviews recent technological advances in ambulatory urodynamics.

Recent Findings

Ambulatory urodynamics is currently recommended by the International Continence Society as a second-line diagnostic tool in patients with nondiagnostic traditional urodynamics. Novel techniques involving telemetric monitoring are in development, which utilize catheter-free wireless systems to address several recognized shortcomings of inoffice urodynamic studies. Current research in catheter-free bladder pressure measurements involves either an intravesical, intradetrusor, or transdetrusor approach. Real-time bladder volume estimation may be performed using ultrasonography, near-infrared spectroscopy, or bladder volume conductance measurement.

Summary

Ambulatory urodynamics can measure bladder function in the “real world” setting, capturing physiological bladder filling and emptying and allowing patients to reproduce the activities that may trigger their symptoms. Telemetric devices being developed represent further advances in this field and focus upon improving diagnostic capabilities, evaluating patient response to treatment, and facilitating closed-loop bladder control with neuroprosthetic integration.

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Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Correspondence to Bradley C. Gill.

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Conflict of Interest

As a result of ongoing research and development, Dr. Damaser reports conflicts of interest that include nonfinancial support from the Hologic, Inc. and the Parker-Hannifin, Inc., as well as an issued patent for an Implantable Pressure Sensor with pending patents on Systems and Methods for Estimating a Volume of a Hollow Organ and a Sensing Device for Ambulatory Urodynamics Having a Pressure Sensitive Housing. No other authors report any relevant financial conflicts of interest.

Human and Animal Rights

The research presented in this article is comprised of a literature review and does not involve the use of live human or animal subjects. However, any studies cited that were performed by the authors and involved human or animal subjects were performed in accordance with all applicable ethical standards, including the Helsinki declaration and its amendments, institutional / national research committee standards, and international/national/institutional guidelines.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Female Urology

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Kocher, N.J., Damaser, M.S. & Gill, B.C. Advances in Ambulatory Urodynamics. Curr Urol Rep 21, 41 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11934-020-00989-w

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Keywords

  • Ambulatory urodynamic monitoring
  • Urodynamics
  • Telemetric
  • Wireless sensor
  • Bladder pressure
  • Urinary incontinence